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Independent Game Forums => Galileo Games => Topic started by: The Groog on July 24, 2007, 11:07:24 PM



Title: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 24, 2007, 11:07:24 PM
I've benn looking for something like Mortal Coil for years. It looks brilliant. 2 questions though:

[1] How unobtrusive are the rules, do they fade into the background, or is this a rules heavy system?
[2] Has anyone adapted these rules for sword and sorcery fantasy? I realise there is no setting as such, but does the system lend itself well to any genre?

Thanks all


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 26, 2007, 01:13:33 AM
99 views ond no replies? I guess not :(


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Brennan Taylor on July 27, 2007, 03:05:11 AM
[1] How unobtrusive are the rules, do they fade into the background, or is this a rules heavy system?
[2] Has anyone adapted these rules for sword and sorcery fantasy? I realise there is no setting as such, but does the system lend itself well to any genre?

I guess people were waiting for me to answer? Who knows.

Anyway, the rules aren't what I would call obtrusive, but they are visible during play. My wife, not a big fan of crunch, like the system, so it must be rules-light enough for her.

The game works just fine for sword-and-sorcery, and I have in fact played it in such a world. It worked great! The only requirement is that magic exists, the rest of the setting is totally customizable.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: GB Steve on July 27, 2007, 06:59:10 AM
I'll just echo what Brennan said. The mechanics are pretty unobtrusive but the choices you make on character sheet have a surprisingly big influence on what happens in the game, even out of conflicts. So choose wisely, or perhaps, interestingly.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 27, 2007, 04:12:13 PM
Good news, great news. Received the book today. Hoping to run it sunday


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 28, 2007, 09:46:14 AM
I was wondering why Horror was used as the main thrust of the game/setting? Having read most of the book, it's easily adapted to any setting. That's a big plus for me.

Can't wait to try this one out.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Brennan Taylor on July 29, 2007, 03:16:21 AM
Mostly because I used it to play horror most of the time, I think. The genre would technically be "supernatural" I guess, with "fantasy" as another take on it.

The illustrations have a horrific look because both the artist and I liked her horror work best. :)


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 29, 2007, 09:40:42 AM
I see what you mean. But I get the feeling the game is being limited by stressing one genre over the other. Having said that, the first game I (we) run will be a simple Zombie infested modern day romp.

About the only criticism I have, is the lack of material for prospective Game Moderators. The game seems aimed at experienced players, I think new comers may flounder a  bit.

Apart from that, top product.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Brennan Taylor on July 29, 2007, 04:16:36 PM
Thanks!

What do you think would be valuable for a more novice player? What kind of material would you like to see?


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 30, 2007, 09:12:44 AM
Good question. Problem is, there are two prospective newcomers here. The hard core role-player, who has the general theme of role-playing sorted. And the true newcomer, whos only experience is getting to level 70 in that well known mmorpg.

I'd like to see some definite solid rules a GM has to abide by. It's all a little bit abstract at the moment. How's about a 'how to design a session/scenario' from the collaborative angle?

Once I'd read the entire book, I got the nagging feeling that, there was something more a GM has to do - a 'something' that really separates him from the players. Of course I don't know what that is. But there you go.

There doesn't seem to be any difference between a player and a GM apart from the little bit of info already in the book and the designation 'Gm and players'. There are a few guidelines such as 'helping to set the scene, bringing passions in to play etc'. Problem is, players do this as well.

Perhaps there could be some lines the players don't cross in the shape of rules.

Personally, as a possible GM, I am going to have a major say in the starting scene, a middle scene to join things together with the climactic scene. Each involves a setting, and characters and all the rest of it. Perhaps the game is perfect as is, and I just need to play the thing.

Sorry, all a bit vague, but I tried :)


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Brennan Taylor on July 30, 2007, 01:28:23 PM
Nope, good stuff, thanks! I think I should talk a bit more specifically about the GM in there. It's important stuff, and seems to be a stumbling block in the game.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on July 31, 2007, 09:25:31 AM
Perhaps a more detailed example of play, 'after' the theme document has been drawn up. Actual game play, involving a structure already set in place by the GM, and perhaps some GM actions and the reasons for making them.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on August 07, 2007, 01:24:07 AM
Actually, one question that comes up for me at least, is who designs the scenario/module/adventure?

Is it the GM, players, both? If both, who has most control? Are the details of the adventure already written up (like normal roleplay modules) or is it all done on the fly?


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: GB Steve on August 07, 2007, 04:04:07 AM
Actually, one question that comes up for me at least, is who designs the scenario/module/adventure?

Is it the GM, players, both? If both, who has most control? Are the details of the adventure already written up (like normal roleplay modules) or is it all done on the fly?
It's a moot point. You clearly can't write out everything in advance because it's a collaborative design at the start of the game. However I've used different models for each of my games.

In the London School of Magic game which I GMed, the theme document was created collaboratively between the players and myself, I framed the first scene but subsequent scenes were mostly framed by the players, although I did frame one or two to ensure narrative consistency.

I ran Twisted 50s game in which we also did the first session collaboratively but one of the players insisted that it be a "proper game with stuff written down" - he feels slightly cheated if the mystery is made up on the fly (although there's no way he can tell). We'd had a few scenes so I built up a plot around those and that's what we played. That said, the PCs called for all the scenes but I had a hand in framing many of them.

Finally our neanderthal game had no GM. We did the theme document as usual but each had a PC. We each made up an enemy for one of the other PCs and scenes were framed by whoever was involved in a scene. Sometimes this meant running NPCs as well as your PC but not too often. We kept the goals of the enemies secret from each other to make it more exciting.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Yokiboy on August 14, 2007, 12:29:50 PM
Actually, one question that comes up for me at least, is who designs the scenario/module/adventure?

Is it the GM, players, both? If both, who has most control? Are the details of the adventure already written up (like normal roleplay modules) or is it all done on the fly?

Man I feel your pain. It is really hard to grasp how to play these type of games, without actually playing them successfully first. The best two games at taking you by the hand and showing you how to roleplay this way is Primetime Adventures and Dogs in the Vineyard. The former does its job by translating all the fuzzy hippie-gaming talk to familiar TV-talk. The latter does its job by outlining exactly how to play, and what's expected of you at each turn, just like the rules to a well-designed boardgame. Read and play those two games and you'll be golden. If that's not an option at this time, check out all of Chris Chinn's writing on playing story games, if you want I can send you his complete works in a PDF - just PM me.

TTFN,

Yoki


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: The Groog on August 15, 2007, 10:35:46 AM
Thanks for the advice. I'm about to give the book a second read through, slowly this time. See what transpires.

Thanks again


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Cooper on September 10, 2007, 07:50:45 AM
What do you think would be valuable for a more novice player? What kind of material would you like to see?

Examples, examples and more examples. I think the best examples of play I have seen in a game have been Vincent's Dogs in the Vineyard. I am sure that is why the game is 150 pages, but it really helped. You have some really good examples in the book, but seeing how the game is very open ended, maybe more examples would help. The Mortal Coil Wiki has helped out too!

This was my very first true "Story Based" indie roleplaying game and it is still my favorite. Brennan, I hope you do not mind, but I always describe this game as "Neil Gaiman the rpg" to those who have never heard of it.


Title: Re: Brilliant Idea
Post by: Brennan Taylor on September 11, 2007, 02:07:15 AM
I don't mind a bit! I'm a big Neal Gaiman fan.