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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4283 Members Latest Member: - otto Most online today: 60 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: Master-slave dialectics, or a reasonable fascimile  (Read 4249 times)
CPXB
Member

Posts: 139


« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2005, 08:06:38 AM »

Yes - but who are the townspeople? That's the question I can't see an answer to, right now.
I was thinking about this and the townspeople could be, if you wanted to run the independence thing.  Rather than forming relationships, the townspeople would have relationships which would need to be severed.  ;)
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-- Chris!
CPXB
Member

Posts: 139


« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2005, 09:16:06 AM »

I find myself ambivalent about a socialist RPG.

On one hand, the utter lack of catharsis amongst socialism, its utter insistence that all media reflect the struggle of the proletariat.  The monotony of socialist artistic discourse frustrates me intensely.  On the other hand, the unspoken and uncritical medievalism and worship of centralized authority present in most games also frustrates me.
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Mike Holmes
Acts of Evil Playtesters
Member

Posts: 10459


« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2005, 07:32:05 AM »

Y'all are aware that I created a whole game called Synthesis based on the Hegelian dialectic. Right?

No?

You can find a copy of it in the files section of Indie Netaming (see my sig). Not a member yet? Well then get over there!

Mike
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Sean
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« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2005, 08:01:58 AM »

The overman isn't really an individual person at all. It's a vision of what humanity as a whole might be. Structually the concept is analagous to the "real self" that lies "not deep within you, but immeasurably high above you" discussed early on in "Schopenhauer as Educator", except that it relates to making something out of humanity as a whole rather than to the individual.

The morality of the person who wants to 'create the overman', the person Zarathustra is trying to recruit, is neither master morality nor slave morality in the traditional senses, I think.

While it's right to say that Nietzsche's work was both misinterpreted and misappropriated by the fascists, even relative to Nietzsche's own intentions, I think Nietzsche's work is much more consistent with fascism than his leftist and liberal advocates tend to grant.

I'd love to waffle on about this at much more length but I have to get ready to teach John Stuart Mill to my students.
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