*
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 14, 2019, 05:22:38 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Forum changes: Editing of posts has been turned off until further notice.
Search:     Advanced search
275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 140 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: Experience playing Shadows with young children  (Read 2209 times)
sdm
Member

Posts: 5


« on: May 03, 2007, 12:09:46 AM »

Logged
sdm
Member

Posts: 5


« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2007, 12:12:11 AM »

Logged
Kesher
Member

Posts: 174


« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2007, 06:02:12 AM »

Hey, sdm, welcome to the Forge!

First, do you have a name I can call you by? Or maybe at least some vowels to add?  Smiley

Second, great post! In a couple of weeks I'm going to play Faery's Tale with my niece and nephew, who are six (almost seven) and four-and-a-half, respectively. I've been wondering what sorts of issues might arise, and you've definitely given me some stuff to watch for. Their dad (my younger brother) and probably their mom will also be playing, so that should help, in that they can look to them for support while I'm the focus of any conflict.

Two observations:

1. It seemed your four year-old actually overcame her fear/excitement (whatever it was making her legs shake) even though she "failed" the roll and her sword broke. I think it's fabulous that she then just jumped right back in with the invisibility button idea; a lot of adult gamers would've been stymied, or just kept trying to violently end the situation. Also, I think you made the right choice about the sword in the first place---younger kids especially have a pretty hazy boundary between "real" and "pretend" anyhow, if my three-and-a-half year-old is any meter. Plus, isn't the world just that much more interesting if you can pull a sword out from under your bed or use the invisibility button on the remote?

2. Isn't it crazy that, just from your short description of the saucers, that they knew it was aliens? Pop culture runs deep and strong...

Lastly, I think you're right on about letting them in on what the Shadow wants; it seems to me to be a key point of any game aimed at younger kids: let them have a say in the stakes of conflict.

Aaron
Logged

sdm
Member

Posts: 5


« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2007, 07:20:16 AM »

Kesher, thanks for the feedback.

You can call me Steve, or you can call me Soodoom, or you can call me Saeidouym, but you doesn't have to call me sdm.  OK how about Steve?

I hope you'll have as much fun with your nephew and niece as I had with my daughters.  It's funny to see how they role-play: In reality my 6 year old is a "live wire", but in the role-play she acts tentatively and cautiously; my 4 year old is "sugar and spice and everything nice", but role-plays with courage and gusto.

I love that the role-playing games allow me to interact and play with my children in a creative and fun way for both of us.  Even though playing dolls is perhaps a form of role-play it's hard for me to enjoy it for very long - I have to force myself to do it.  With the role-playing I hope to spend time with them in a way that we both enjoy.  My primary goal is to spend time together but I also see it as a chance to help pass on some values as well.

Regarding your first observation about "grabbing a sword from under the bed" and "the invisibility button on the remote" I found that giving more control to the children made the game more fun for both of us.  They were much more creative than I could have been.

On the second observation I also noticed that they immediately shouted "aliens!"  I'll admit I went with something very common and cliche, but I thought they would perhaps have to "discover" what the disc was in X-files fashion -- no way!  They immediately "knew" it was aliens Smiley
Logged
matthijs
Member

Posts: 462


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2007, 09:45:23 AM »

Cool actual play. I love reading about parents playing RPGs with their kids. I have a five-year-old son, and we've played a few random games at great intervals; they've always been a success, but we've never used any published systems.
Logged

Arturo G.
Member

Posts: 333


« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2007, 12:40:20 PM »

Hi, Steve!

Very nice play! I like it a lot.

I have had a look to the rules of Shadows and the first thing that kept my attention was exactly that the GM asks for rolls, but the rules say that the player decides both, what she and her shadow wants. There is nice advise about helping the player to decide if necessary, but not to interfere with her, and specially avoid to force her in a direction the GM wants. As far as I understood the rules, you create the opposition during the narration and by selecting the moments for asking for a roll. Normally, you do not need to say anything about what the shadow of a player wants.

I'm sure that if you follow that advice everything will run smoothly and your children will be able to tune the game to the appropriate level without noticing.

About adding the tokens. Be sure they understand early in the game what are you (as GM) going to do with them (create bad opposition). For example, at the beginning, return the tokens they invest to them quickly, in low level conflicts, to make them understand the power they put in your hands when using the tokens. Then you may slowly increase the tension of the moments you are using them, or begin to safe them until the players get rid of tokens and feel the consequences.
 
Thanks to share your actual play with us.
Logged
komradebob
Member

Posts: 462


« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2007, 02:56:27 PM »

Steve:
A quick thing about the dice rolls:
With dice, the player gets their way on ties also, which means that a player's chances are better than 50/50. It's a minor difference, but worth noting when you have a chance to play using dice.

Using tokens:
Tokens, IIRC, can be used by any player to make the rolling player reroll the die of choice. That's important, because it means a player can help another player who has their Shadow die as the highest die, if they wish.

(Given that you're playing with your two daughters, that could make for some interesting dynamics: Sibling Rivalry or Sibling Unity? Hmm...)

What the Shadow wants:
If it helps, let any player offer suggestions, but only the throwing player gets to choose what happens if the Shadow die comes up highest.

I'm glad you got to try the game out. I have a huge amount of admiration for that design. Not only is it great with kids, but it is really a good "training wheels" game for adult gamers learning to play games with Stake Setting/outcome mechanics.

I look forward to hearing more if you get another session in soon.
Logged

Robert Earley-Clark

currently developing:The Village Game:Family storytelling with toys
Arturo G.
Member

Posts: 333


« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2007, 05:16:50 AM »

Using tokens:
Tokens, IIRC, can be used by any player to make the rolling player reroll the die of choice. That's important, because it means a player can help another player who has their Shadow die as the highest die, if they wish.

I was failing to get this. It is even more interesting for me now.
For a moment, I was tempted to think that it means you have the possibility of using the tokens to work for, or against, the interests of another player. But I think it is better. You may use the tokens to promote one of the ideas introduced by the other player. The one you like most. But both has been introduced by the other player. All of them being valuable investment.
One of the invested ideas is going to be lost, but players may use the tokens to select which one they find more interesting at a given moment.
Logged
Pages: [1]
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Oxygen design by Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!