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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 158 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: [Planet] Attributes  (Read 1010 times)
khyron1144
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Posts: 14


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« on: September 10, 2009, 11:24:47 PM »

Here's the start of the attributes system for Planet.  This is what I've got finished so far, so the abrupt cut-off is sort of intentional:



Attributes<Temporary and Permanent Points
Each attribute comes in two categories: permanent points and temporary points.  Temporary points can be depleted in various ways, for instance temporary strength, also known as health, is depleted by being hit in combat.  You start with a number of temporary points equal to your permanent points in each category.  Your permanent points are what you just rolled on 2d6 in the previous step.

Temporary Strength (Health): goes down when you get hurt.  It comes back at a rate of one-third of your permanent value per day.

Temporary Mind: is used to cast spells and use Psi powers.  It comes back at a rate of one third of your permanent value per hour.

Temporary Speed: is used to take actions in combat.  It returns to your full permanent value every round of combat (rounds will be explained better later).

Attribute Comparisons<Mind
1:  Dumber than a bag of hammers.  You can count to 2, do your own Velcro (if you're in the shoe-wearing habit), and write your own name (it is X, right?).
 
2:  Smarter than most plants.  You can count to 5, have been potty trained (or house-broken), and can write your own name in real letters.

3:  You've been to school (mostly to use the playground).

4:  You'll never be accused of brilliance, but you can do sums, and you know how to read and write about one hundred monosyllabic words. 

5:  A notch below average.  Algebra makes you dizzy and you have a vague memory of the Pythagorean theorem as that A^2 + B^2 = C^2 thing.  You can sound out most words.

6:  Average, you know as much math, science, history, and language skills as you ought to and not a bit more.

7:   A notch above average.  You know what gravitons, photons, and neutrinos are and do the crossword every day in non-erasable ink.

8:  Very bright.  You could win on that Millionaire show if not for those stupid pop-culture questions that you don't know anything about because you were too busy reading Stephen Hawking.

9:  Genius.  You understand Einstein and Darwin and might significantly refine or improve upon their theories.

10:  Super Genius.  You will replace Einstein as the standard pop-culture allusion to intellect.

11:  Ultra-Mega-Super Genius.  The only reason you don't rule the world is because it would mean work, work all day and no time to play with your pet theories.

12:  Greatest Human Mind Ever.  You do rule the world; you just choose to be very subtle about it.

13+:  Beyond Human.  If you don't know it, no one does.

Speed<Strength
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I like living in the past.
It's so predictable.
Warrior Monk
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Posts: 85


« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2009, 08:34:49 AM »

looks good for me, I'm also working something around these lines. So far your system seems to fit a more combat focused-quick roleplaying, where character creation takes minutes instead of hours. How would you prefer to deal with the social interactions between characters? old D&D alignments? Vampire-like clash between nature and behavior? Some sort of system that rewards specific players behaviors?

Dunno about you, but I'm thinking of stitching together a sort of quick version of Universalis for instant world creation and something from dogs in the vineyard for the skills: instead of having a long list of skills each with their description, players just suggest 3 things they want their characters to be good at and assign a fixed bonus. I'm hoping this leads to a quick-starting simple game that even complete noobs get to understand quickly. Let me know if we can help each other with our projects, and best luck!
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MacLeod
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Posts: 216


« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2009, 05:46:18 PM »

The distinction between permanent and temporary values is a pretty sharp idea. =D
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~*/\Matthew Miller/\*~
khyron1144
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Posts: 14


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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2009, 08:42:26 PM »

looks good for me, I'm also working something around these lines. So far your system seems to fit a more combat focused-quick roleplaying, where character creation takes minutes instead of hours. How would you prefer to deal with the social interactions between characters? old D&D alignments? Vampire-like clash between nature and behavior? Some sort of system that rewards specific players behaviors?

Dunno about you, but I'm thinking of stitching together a sort of quick version of Universalis for instant world creation and something from dogs in the vineyard for the skills: instead of having a long list of skills each with their description, players just suggest 3 things they want their characters to be good at and assign a fixed bonus. I'm hoping this leads to a quick-starting simple game that even complete noobs get to understand quickly. Let me know if we can help each other with our projects, and best luck!


My basic goal is to have a system where character creation can be done in under fifteen minutes, including initial equipment selection.  Race and class can even be assigned by random roll on a table, if necessary.  One thing I noticed trying to teach D&D to noobs is that the places that things get frozen is where choices have to be made and options explained.

I am not necessarily a fan of systems for personalities: alignment, old White Wolf's Archetypes, or New White Wolf's Virtues and Vices, just to name the bigger names.  I believe that the role part of roleplaying should be mostly supplied by the player.  I do however kind of like rewards systems that take behavior into account:  the allegiance system from Chaosium's Elric! is the best example.

I am not familiar with Universalis or Dogs in the Vineyard.  I've heard the names, but never seen the actual game in question.

Good luck to you too.
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I like living in the past.
It's so predictable.
khyron1144
Member

Posts: 14


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« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2009, 06:07:55 PM »

Here's the rest of the comparisons/ benchmarks.  It took me a while to find the notebook I have the pencil draft of this game in.



Strength
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I like living in the past.
It's so predictable.
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