*
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 19, 2019, 11:05:16 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Forum changes: Editing of posts has been turned off until further notice.
Search:     Advanced search
275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 93 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
Pages: [1] 2
Print
Author Topic: Combat Examples of an Engine without Hit Points  (Read 4670 times)
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« on: January 21, 2010, 06:36:51 AM »

King Arthur and Lancelot circle each other, preparing to duel. They are both wearing armour and fighting with sword and shield. After his knights were soundly beaten by the graceful warrior, Arthur knew Lancelot would be more than a challenge for him (composure checked: passed).

Round 1<Round 2<Notes
Logged
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2010, 06:59:50 AM »

Question 1
Do you find the combat engine to be engaging?

Question 2
Does the example make sense to you at first glance?

Question 3
Are there any flaws you can point out that need to be addressed?

Question 4
Would you enjoy outwitting the GM with such a system?
Logged
whoknowswhynot
Member

Posts: 55

MAYA the RPG


WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2010, 10:30:40 PM »

Quote
Question 1
Do you find the combat engine to be engaging?
This system requires more of the player than just rolling the dice and has a very good feel to it.  It encourages you to make decisions and actually role play a combat scenario instead of just saying "I'm attacking [so-and-so]" and rolling dice.


Yes.  Good enough example.

Quote
Question 3
Are there any flaws you can point out that need to be addressed?
I would only be afraid of the skills list being big, but I have always been afraid of long skill lists.  This is not really a flaw, though.

Quote
Question 4
Would you enjoy outwitting the GM with such a system?
Absorutely!
Logged

We are equal beings and the universe is our relations with each other. The universe is made of one kind of entity: each one is alive, each determines the course of his own existence.
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2010, 05:37:27 AM »

/i
Logged
Callan S.
Member

Posts: 3588


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2010, 08:38:56 PM »

Just seems like having actions instead of hitpoints.

The real change I'd say is that you seem to have a 'one must pass' system, unlike in traditional games where both guys can swing and miss and...nothing happens. Here you set it that even if one guy rolls a 2, if the other guy rolls a 1, one of them connects and hits and something actually happens. I'd say that's the strength of your idea here - not the hitpoints thing.
Logged

Philosopher Gamer
<meaning></meaning>
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2010, 01:58:56 AM »

Logged
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2010, 02:25:15 AM »

I]

VS

The opponent hits you for (rolls dice, and adds modifiers) x amount of damage.  Hold on a second, I need to look up the effects for tha

VS

The opponent hits you for (rolls dice, and adds modifiers) x amount of damage.  Hold on a second, I need to look up the effects for that.[/I

VS

The opponent hits you for (rolls dice, and adds modifiers) x amount of damage.  Hold on a second, I need to look up the effects for tha

VS

The opponent hits you for (rolls dice, and adds modifiers) x amount of damage.  Hold on a second, I need to look up the effects for that.
Logged
contracycle
Member

Posts: 2807


« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2010, 11:34:12 AM »

Hit point based and wound based systems are definitely very different in feel.  In a ahit point system, even when hit points are in a small range, the expectation is that you will be hit and wittled down.  That informs the way you play.  Wound effect systems do not have this assumption, and everyone tries to avoid being hit at all.  Things do play out quite differently as a result.
Logged

Impeach the bomber boys:
www.impeachblair.org
www.impeachbush.org

"He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast."
- Leonardo da Vinci
dindenver
Member

Posts: 928

Don't Panic!


WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2010, 01:46:19 PM »

Ar,
  The mechanics are a bit obscured by the narrative, so I just want to ask some questions:

Quote
Quote
Quote
Quote
Quote
Logged

Dave M
Author of Legends of Lanasia RPG (Still in beta)
My blog
Free Demo
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2010, 05:46:32 PM »

Logged
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2010, 05:58:14 PM »

Reversals
A reversal is when you turn a successful defensive maneuver into an offensive maneuver. For example, when an opponent tries to take you down by the legs, you sprawl and catch him in a headlock, or you parry an opponent's punch and turn the parry into an arm lock.
As opposed to a counterattack, a reversal is executed as one fluid action, rather than two individual actions in succession. Also, most reversals cannot be actively defended against and require the usage of Concentration to pull off. These techniques require that you use your Concentration effort pool in order to use because perfect timing is such an important factor.  To maximize realism and to highlight how difficult it really is to time these things, I'm currently debating on whether or not I will require a high Concentration use roll (scoring a 4 on a d4 roll) in order to successfully pull off a reversal. In which case, every time you level up your reversal technique, your chances will improve by 25% (pending: your reversal success rate based off of your Reflex attribute instead).
Logged
leodegrance
Member

Posts: 9


« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2010, 02:58:41 AM »

Ok its enough for me.... I want those rules :-) Do you have a website or .pdf hosted somewhere with them?
M.
Logged
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2010, 05:20:35 AM »

Unfortunately, I'm not web savvy.  I also move at a snail's pace, and the bare bones of the system isn't yet complete - once it is I'll release them here.  In the meantime, I am more than willing to comprehensively answer any questions you may have.
Logged
horomancer
Member

Posts: 54


« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2010, 01:27:37 PM »

I like your combat story boarding system. I too am working on a system without HP but have gone the opposite route of generalizing combat to a point where you declare your intentions, then story board what happened after the dice have revealed the conclusion.
I was wondering, in your system how would a 'fumble' arise and be interpreted? In the above example, something such as one character loosing their footing and failing to perform the action they intended. A more clear example, if we use a more modern setting, is what if you are in a gun fight and your gun jams at a crucial moment? How would that risk exist in your system? When would it come about if ever and how would it effect the flow of combat?
Logged
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2010, 05:34:40 PM »

I like your combat story boarding system. I too am working on a system without HP but have gone the opposite route of generalizing combat to a point where you declare your intentions, then story board what happened after the dice have revealed the conclusion.
I was wondering, in your system how would a 'fumble' arise and be interpreted? In the above example, something such as one character loosing their footing and failing to perform the action they intended. A more clear example, if we use a more modern setting, is what if you are in a gun fight and your gun jams at a crucial moment? How would that risk exist in your system? When would it come about if ever and how would it effect the flow of combat?

When your character uses effort, the randomizer is implemented and you suffer a critical failure when your roll comes out to zero two or more times (the dice explodes every time you roll zero).  The severity of the failure is equal to the number of zeroes you roll.  So, let's say you try desperately to punch an elusive boxer: when you roll a double zero (1 in 16), you lose balance from extending too far, and when you roll a triple zero (1 in 64), you fall.
In high-variability circumstances, the randomizer is always used - like if you were shooting a gun.  In that case, the critical failure rule applies with differing critical failure rates based upon the weapon's quality.  A shitty gun might have a jam on double zeroes, a dud on triple and weapon failure on a quadruple (1 in 256).
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Oxygen design by Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!