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Author Topic: Destined: The scope of conflicts  (Read 1690 times)
szilard
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« on: April 22, 2003, 08:14:07 AM »

In Destined, I fluctuate between wanting the resolution mechanic to be focussed upon specific conflicts (or parts of conflicts) and entire scenes. The resolution mechanic is FitM: first, the problematic situation is posed and the player states, roughly, what he would like to see it resolved as. Second, the player rolls vs. the GM. This gives a result which indicates whether the player's solution comes to pass and how many complications are in evidence. Third, the scene is narrated (who gets to narrate is dependent upon what die pool the player chooses to roll), using the dice outcomes as a guide.

Here are some examples of what I want the system to do:

* Resolve, in one roll, a master swordsman cutting a swath through a horde of minions to get to their master.
* Resolve, in a few rolls that have cumulative effects (representing a struggle), a duel between that swordsman and the master of the minions.

*Resolve, in one roll, whether a character can escape unnoticed from a location (of varying scale -perhaps from a room to a city).
*Resolve, in a few rolls that have cumulative effects, whether a character can escape unnoticed from a location (of varying scale -perhaps from a room to a city) when that character is being actively hunted for and the escape is a climactic event.

*Resolve, in one roll, how negotiations turn out between a character and an important NPC.
* Resolve, in a few rolls that have cumulative effects, how negotiations turn out between a character and an important NPC in a particularly delicate situation.

The question I have is how do I determine the scope between the two choices in each case. My options as I see them (if anyone can think of others, I'd be interested in hearing them):

1. The GM can freely determine the scope. If the player wants to resolve a situation with a single roll and the GM feels it would require a more in-depth struggle, then the GM can mandate that multiple rolls be required.

2. As (1), but the GM - in doing this - must award the player a plot point after the roll is resolved.

3. As (2), but the Player can also call for a roll to become a struggle by expending a plot point.

My big concern is that I am afraid that the social mechanics between player and GM here might be a bit clumsy. If anyone has any ideas on how to finesse them, I am really curious.

...or perhaps my concerns are misplaced. I'm not sure.


Stuart
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Ron Edwards
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2003, 08:35:21 AM »

Hi Stuart,

Both Hero Wars (Quest) and Trollbabe provide explicit rules and ideas about scaling a given conflict into single rolls vs. several rolls. The neat thing is that both games don't change the system to do it, but rather parse the system across in-game interpretations. It's hard to explain briefly, and I've found that the idea is best demonstrated through play.

Overall, I think your goal is to make sure that the system works in either case, and then to permit groups simply to apply the possible range of its application as they see fit. You may be anticipating more trouble than actually exists, although of course, it won't be known until playtesting.

Best,
Ron
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szilard
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2003, 07:04:40 AM »

Quote from: Ron Edwards
Hi Stuart,

Both Hero Wars (Quest) and Trollbabe provide explicit rules and ideas about scaling a given conflict into single rolls vs. several rolls. The neat thing is that both games don't change the system to do it, but rather parse the system across in-game interpretations. It's hard to explain briefly, and I've found that the idea is best demonstrated through play.


Hi Ron,

Unfortunately, I don't have either game yet. Both are on my too-long list of things to buy (and they just moved up in priority on it), but since it looks like I might be getting laid off next week due to a serious lack of organizational funding here, I probably shouldn't be making progress on that list any time soon. I don't suppose that you can think of any old threads here at the Forge that discuss this? I tried searching, but searching for things like "conflict resolution" at the Forge is like looking for a needle in, well, a big spile of needles.

Quote

Overall, I think your goal is to make sure that the system works in either case, and then to permit groups simply to apply the possible range of its application as they see fit. You may be anticipating more trouble than actually exists, although of course, it won't be known until playtesting.


I very well might. My general preference, though, is to anticipate trouble rather than have it sneak up on me. I suspect that any of my options above would probably work, but I've had a nagging doubt about it...

Stuart[/quote]
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Sparky
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2003, 02:01:06 PM »

The easy rule of thumb I use is to start out using more scene resolution and then move into more 'personal and detailed' task-sort of resolution for important events. I try to move from scene to task resolution in a gradual way as the game works itself up to a dramatic point. It lets me keep things on track when I want them to and frees me to work off the cuff when I want to see where things will go on their own.

Stir and mix for specific effect desired, of course.

-Chris
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Christoffer Lernö
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2003, 09:31:34 PM »

Stuart, even the quickstart rules for Hero Wars are very helpful. I think you'll get quite a lot of inspiration from them alone.
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szilard
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2003, 06:37:13 AM »

Thanks for the heads-up.

Stuart
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