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Independent Game Forums => Bully Pulpit Games => Topic started by: AXUM on June 19, 2008, 11:35:15 AM



Title: tHE ROACH HAS BEEN AT WORK HERE...
Post by: AXUM on June 19, 2008, 11:35:15 AM
Hello!


Why is the Convocation & Greeting of the Class for 1919 Event instead for the Class of 1923 (in the book & character sheet)???

Has the Roach been at work here?

A time-space paradigm been broken?

Are the Olde Roaches returning at last?



Axum


Title: Re: tHE ROACH HAS BEEN AT WORK HERE...
Post by: Steve Segedy on June 19, 2008, 04:33:33 PM
Hi Axum,

The Convocation and Greeting event (held in the Fall of 1919) is welcoming in the new batch of Freshman, who will graduate four years later as the Class of 1923.  Assuming they survive their time at Pemberton, that is.


Title: Re: tHE ROACH HAS BEEN AT WORK HERE...
Post by: Jason Morningstar on June 20, 2008, 06:56:24 AM
1919 was a pretty rough year for retention at Pemberton.  Of the 101 incoming freshmen present at the Convocation, 89 were later victims of the "bass drum" incident during the homecoming game against Colby, 3 were ejected for academic irregularities or pregnancy, 2 were thrown in molten bronze, 2 were exsanguinated, and one became some sort of God.  The remaining four stuck with it and matriculated in 1923.


Title: Re: THE ROACH HAS BEEN AT WORK HERE...
Post by: AXUM on June 20, 2008, 02:01:35 PM
1919 was a pretty rough year for retention at Pemberton.  Of the 101 incoming freshmen present at the Convocation, 89 were later victims of the "bass drum" incident during the homecoming game against Colby, 3 were ejected for academic irregularities or pregnancy, 2 were thrown in molten bronze, 2 were exsanguinated, and one became some sort of God.  The remaining four stuck with it and matriculated in 1923.

Hello again.


Thanks for the clarifying remarks... I should've known better.  Ever since I had that strange dream I keep finding myself at the oddest locations & missing facts, etc....


BTW:
Thanks for the 1919 review info. Seems this yearly high attrition rate was indeed one of the shatterpoints which quickly bankrupted Pemberton, (besides others, already better known) yet, one not that publicly accepted.  I see no mention of these figures in the famous non-fiction by W. W. Wilhelm Kroos, Esq. ("The Case Against Pemberton", Golden Goblin Press, 1989).


Thanks again!
Axum