*
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 03, 2021, 03:17:24 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Forum changes: Editing of posts has been turned off until further notice.
Search:     Advanced search
275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 93 - most online ever: 565 (October 17, 2020, 02:08:06 PM)
Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: [DitV][Blue Rose] Keepers of the Flame visit High Rockton  (Read 2744 times)
oliof
Member

Posts: 449

Harald Wagener - Zurich, Switzerland


WWW
« on: October 28, 2005, 06:10:52 PM »

Just a little teaser to have some follow up posts.

First, transposing Dogs to Aldea/Jarzon is a snap. Just replace names.

Second, Eric Provosts towns rock. Without his hard work on High Rockton, I'd been lost

Third, I missed the guns.

Fourth, I did something the rules didn't cover to give the players some critical information I wasn't able to convey otherwise. When they were in a conflict where what they put at stake was something the demons wanted, I gave them the dice for demonic influence. This first was shocking, but I think it was one of the best appliances of game rules of the evening.

More details after getting some sleep.

Regards,
    oliof
Logged

Vaxalon
Member

Posts: 1619


« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2005, 06:40:31 PM »

I am totally behind handing the PC's some d10's in a conflict, and saying, "Demonic influence.  No really... on YOUR side."
Logged

"In our game the other night, Joshua's character came in as an improvised thing, but he was crap so he only contributed a d4!"
                                     --Vincent Baker
Frank T
Guest
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2005, 04:12:21 AM »

It rocked. Here is my German actual play report.

The guns are really missing. And "Dogs" keep slipping out instead of "Keepers". More after Harald posts his report.
Logged
oliof
Member

Posts: 449

Harald Wagener - Zurich, Switzerland


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2005, 06:49:54 AM »

Quote
First, transposing Dogs to Aldea/Jarzon is a snap. Just replace names.

Really, I mean it. We did also fiddle a bit with ceremony (using ash instead of clay, oil instead of water, and calling one's spark instead the real name) because of the different color the King of Light and the Purifying Light convey.

Quote
Second, Eric Provosts towns rock. Without his hard work on High Rockton, I'd been lost.

Not only that, but the random NPC generators rocked my boat last night as well. Not only did we have this unfulfilled love triangle as the root cause of the town's (budding) troubles, but some very capable characters. I found it very challenging at times to think up believable traits on the spot to keep the conflict running smoothly, especially the final show down (where everyone was tired), but this is one of the useful details that get overlooked when reading the rules: You make up the NPCs traits as You go, As GM, it's your responsibilty to give the players opponents it's worth having a conflict with. This is one of the tools to make this possible in play.

Quote
Third, I missed the guns.

I think the importance of guns in the escalation mechanics should not be underestimated. Pulling a gun and shooting someone has an immediacy that unsheathing a sword and stabbing someone does not convey for me. There were two or three occasions last night where Frank or I had sort of a silent understanding that having guns would have changed the way that particular conflict would have turned that moment.

Quote
Fourth, I did something the rules didn't cover to give the players some critical information I wasn't able to convey otherwise. When they were in a conflict where what they put at stake was something the demons wanted, I gave them the dice for demonic influence. This first was shocking, but I think it was one of the best appliances of game rules of the evening.

This technique allows the GM to really enforce the players' recognition of where sin is involved. I am not judging anybody, this is still the Dogs' job. I am pointing out in a matter that is not to be misunderstood. "You are treading the mills of the demons right now guys. Reconsider what You know, think of what You need to fix."

And it caused an almost physical change in the whole athmosphere of the game. There were no actual demons, no magic, no singing angelic choruses, but sex crave, which was given a path into the community by the pride of a young lady and her unjust behavior regarding the matching of brides and grooms.

Even before that, the game had shown where it shined. When the Keepers/Dogs discussed how to handle the sinners, the Players(!) very quickly realized that they couldn't finish this town and leave behind everyone happy ever after.

I won't tell anybody something new here, but the conflict resolution system just works, and readily scales into group conflicts. Of course, if you are one against many, it's hard to stand up to the opposition. But in the final conflict, Erol/Edwin dominated the conflict for about the beginning two/thirds against two dogs (admittedly he had 2d10 demonic influence on his side, and later a 2d10 'despises the dogs' trait and 1d10 relationship to Keeper Zaroun, Franks Dog^WKeeper), and then slowly his contempt and resolve gained some cracks. Erols final Raise was a straight twenty, where he pushed Zaroun into Arnosk, Ron's Keeper, and Ron had to give. Frank also took the blow, but finally Zaroun came out with his big sword and told Erol he'd certainly use it if need be.

Only then did Erol confess and vowed by the flame of his hearth fire to abstain from his sinful behavior.

Fallout after this mostly non-physical conflict was full of surprises. Erol did suffer some short-term fallout, but Zaroun got 12 Fallout (8d4 3d6 Fallout) and managed to roll a 12, and then blew his body roll to avoid going up to being badly injured.

I instantly gave in the healing conflict (the steward not only "Was a Young one myself, once" but also was a "healer"), because it was 3 in the morning and the conflict did warrant for a dying Keeper/Dog in anybody's mind. Frank was quite shocked to see his fallout dice come back at him combined with the demonic influence in all this, and we went through the initial dice rolling until I decided to give (the idea was Franks, but I already was thinking by myself "how do I just lose, Zaroun dying now would not be fair or even the right thing for the story".

Conclusion: I want to run this game again (with guns).
Logged

Frank T
Guest
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2005, 09:09:13 AM »

I think it was a good session, and fun play. Ron might have had a little trouble in the beginning, but I think he "got" the game better as play went on. The final conflict was definitely the best one, although it seemed a little strange that Brother Zaroun should be in mortal danger because of a little shoving. Also, if I'm not mistaken, it's not hard at all to get your Dog killed, or is it? This didn't occur to me when reading the rules, but if there's murder in town and you have to take a blow being shot, that's at least 8d10 in the healing conflict, right? Oh boy.

Speaking of shooting: I agree that swords just aren't the same as guns. Guns are so small, easily drawn, and deadly. Even pointing them is dangerous because everybody knows they tend to blow off. If a shot rings out in the middle of night, the whole town will be instantly awake. You don't need to be strong, or skilled, to kill someone with a gun. Even a kid can do it. However, I think this is mostly Color. Important Color, but not very relevant to Situation in most cases.

Quote
the conflict did warrant for a dying Keeper/Dog in anybody's mind

I'm sure you mean it did not warrant for a dying Keeper, right? Aside: I took 6d6 8d4 fallout alltogether. Not bad.
Logged
oliof
Member

Posts: 449

Harald Wagener - Zurich, Switzerland


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2005, 09:21:32 AM »

I think it was a good session, and fun play. Ron might have had a little trouble in the beginning, but I think he "got" the game better as play went on.

And let's not forget that one of the strongest claim Arnosk, Ron's Keeper has is "I am calm". And he was. A great concept to give a new game a visit. I also think that he really got into the game later on.

Quote
The final conflict was definitely the best one, although it seemed a little strange that Brother Zaroun should be in mortal danger because of a little shoving. Also, if I'm not mistaken, it's not hard at all to get your Dog killed, or is it? This didn't occur to me when reading the rules, but if there's murder in town and you have to take a blow being shot, that's at least 8d10 in the healing conflict, right? Oh boy.
Yes, being a Dog is no easy thing. Upon rereading the thread about the GM throwing the healing conflict, this might have been a great opportunity to have the real demons fight Zaroun, the Steward calling on his Spark to get him back. But not at that time of night.
Quote
Speaking of shooting: I agree that swords just aren't the same as guns. Guns are so small, easily drawn, and deadly. Even pointing them is dangerous because everybody knows they tend to blow off. If a shot rings out in the middle of night, the whole town will be instantly awake. You don't need to be strong, or skilled, to kill someone with a gun. Even a kid can do it. However, I think this is mostly Color. Important Color, but not very relevant to Situation in most cases.

As I said, it does skewer the escalation scale a bit, and I just need to try a Dogs game with guns to feel the difference. Maybe then I see it the way You do.

Quote
Quote
the conflict did warrant for a dying Keeper/Dog in anybody's mind

Quote

I'm sure you mean it did not warrant for a dying Keeper, right? Aside: I took 6d6 8d4 fallout alltogether. Not bad.

Of course!
Logged

Pages: [1]
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Oxygen design by Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!