*
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 21, 2014, 02:17:16 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Forum changes: Editing of posts has been turned off until further notice.
Search:     Advanced search
275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4283 Members Latest Member: - otto Most online today: 62 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
Print
Author Topic: Lines vs. Authors  (Read 6924 times)
Joshua A.C. Newman
Member

Posts: 1144

the glyphpress


WWW
« Reply #45 on: December 16, 2005, 03:17:56 AM »

In the first case, Joshua, what we're attempting to do here is create name recognition. You don't do that by hiding the names. Look at Osprey books: there are, what, 6, 8 plates in each one? But the artist gets a byline and people buy them by artist. I sure do: Angus McBride gets my dollars every time.

In comics, the practice of putting any creators' names on the cover is a recent thing coming from the indie comics revolution of the 80s and 90s. It's something that's served them well, and I think we should look at it.

Now, granted, a comic artist has to draw every page, but I think we can learn from Alan Moore, Steve Bissette, et al. that giving credit where it's due can be of tremendous benefit to all parties.

There's another concern, though, and this is a book design thing: you can really only put so much stuff on the cover before it becomes a muddy mess. I'm thinking that the back matter might be a good place to put this.
Logged

the glyphpress's games are Shock: Social Science Fiction and Under the Bed.

I design books like Dogs in the Vineyard and The Mountain Witch.
Jonathan Walton
Member

Posts: 1309


WWW
« Reply #46 on: December 16, 2005, 10:35:36 AM »

To respond to Joshua x 2:

I agree with Joshua N. that it benefits all of us to CREATE name recognition, not just for game authors, but for artists and designers as well.  For example, I am a graphic design enthusiast.  It's fun for me to check out what prominent indie game layout guys, like Joshua N. or Matt Snyder, are doing.  Likewise, there are some great artists who seem to work on lots of cool indie games: Jennifer Rodgers, Keith Senkowski, etc.  And there are people who might begin to seek them out.  So, yes, from a marketing standpoint and from the standpoint of helping these other creators gain a following and build their careers, I think it makes sense.

Another thing: if you treat people like they don't have any stake in or real ownership of the work they create, then they DO walk away once they get paid, which is a blow to the game and the community that surrounds it, in my opinion.  Games and game lines that really respect and appreciate the people who do work for them see that respect paid back tenfold.  I'm thinking particularly of the Exalted and In Nomine communities, where game authors would often hang around on message boards or email lists or post online material in support of the game, and this had nothing to do with being paid.  When people feel like they are a real part of something, they stick around and support your game, because it becomes THEIR game too.  I don't see any reason why this wouldn't happen if artists and layout people started to feel more involved, having a strong committment and interest in seeing a game succeed.

In any case, YMMV.  This isn't a "everyone deserves front cover credit" manifesto.  Yet.
Logged

Josh Roby
Member

Posts: 1055

Category Three Forgite


WWW
« Reply #47 on: December 16, 2005, 10:47:12 AM »

I don't see any reason why this wouldn't happen if artists and layout people started to feel more involved, having a strong committment and interest in seeing a game succeed.

I distill my prior point down to one line: Instead of making everybody feel involved in the end product, we should actually involve them in the end product, and then print all the involved parties on the cover.
Logged

Joshua A.C. Newman
Member

Posts: 1144

the glyphpress


WWW
« Reply #48 on: December 16, 2005, 11:05:04 AM »

Right on, my fellow Joshua.

I work for scale with Forge folks. If I believe in a project, I'll get paid as a percentage of sales. If I don't believe in the project, I won't offer my services. Of course, there are a billion other reasons not to work on a project, too, but we're a community: believing in each other gives us power.
Logged

the glyphpress's games are Shock: Social Science Fiction and Under the Bed.

I design books like Dogs in the Vineyard and The Mountain Witch.
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Oxygen design by Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!