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Source material for Fae Noir games

Started by JustinB, September 12, 2007, 08:01:27 PM

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JustinB

Let's make a list of suggested source material to inspire Fae Noir adventures/stories.
For me, the best noir author is definitely Raymond Chandler, so anything by him is okay with me. His collection The Simple Art of Murder is a very good collection of short stories, many of which can be easily translated into an RPG adventure.
The film To Cast a Deadly Spell is another great source that closely parallels the setting of Fae Noir (although I hadn't seen or even heard of the movie until after completing the game).
Obviously Grimm's Fairy Tales is solid as are these.
I'd also say that Damon Runyon's work is a good source, even though the stories are more upbeat than true noir. I like the Runyon stories because I feel they depict New York of the era in an uncompromising, though light-hearted way. Additionally, his criminal cast tends to have wacky adventures that occassionally resemble a good game session.
Anybody else have some favorite noir sources or specific fairy tales that can make good adventures?
Check out Fae Noir, a game of 1920's fantasy. http://greenfairygames.com

Ron Edwards

My top picks would be Cat People (1942) and Curse of the Cat People (1944), both produced by Val Lewton. (film fans should look this guy up)

The first has very little in common with its flashy 1980s remake. It's really a hard-core, noir mystery, and turns out to be very sad, more of a black-magic romantic tragedy than a horror flick. The second is even more off the beaten path, and doesn't have much to do with cats at all - it's about an imaginative child, the ghost who may or may not live in the back yard, and the tensions of her parents. They are both really incredible stories about magic, horror, and genuine emotions, but also totally embedded in American lives and values of the time. They're shadowy, beautiful, and moody.

Best, Ron

thornlord

While not directly related to Noir.  I would like to recommend "Jonathan Strange and Mr Norell" at least when it comes to some of the historical events that were forgotten by the current age.  I plan on making that a large theme of my game.

JustinB

Quote from: thornlord on September 16, 2007, 03:32:20 PM
While not directly related to Noir.  I would like to recommend "Jonathan Strange and Mr Norell" at least when it comes to some of the historical events that were forgotten by the current age.  I plan on making that a large theme of my game.

I haven't gotten to read that book yet, but have been meaning to. I have about 3 different friends who have all promised to loan it to me, but no such luck as of this point.
What are you planning on doing with your game that would involve that sort of "secret history?"
Check out Fae Noir, a game of 1920's fantasy. http://greenfairygames.com

JustinB

Quote from: Ron Edwards on September 14, 2007, 11:37:00 PM
My top picks would be Cat People (1942) and Curse of the Cat People (1944), both produced by Val Lewton. (film fans should look this guy up)

The first has very little in common with its flashy 1980s remake. It's really a hard-core, noir mystery, and turns out to be very sad, more of a black-magic romantic tragedy than a horror flick. The second is even more off the beaten path, and doesn't have much to do with cats at all - it's about an imaginative child, the ghost who may or may not live in the back yard, and the tensions of her parents. They are both really incredible stories about magic, horror, and genuine emotions, but also totally embedded in American lives and values of the time. They're shadowy, beautiful, and moody.

Best, Ron

Ron, I've been having some trouble finding these to watch, but they sound awesome! Did you draw inspiration for Mutual Decision from Cat People?
Check out Fae Noir, a game of 1920's fantasy. http://greenfairygames.com

katonahtr

While it isn't exactly noir, there's a great book by Marc McCutcheon that is proving to be a great source of back ground info for the adventure I'm trying to put together. It's called The Writer's Guide To: Everyday Life from Prohibition through World War II. He lists popular songs, and radio shows by year, as well as fashion, slang and automotive info.   

Ron Edwards

Hi Justin,

Sorry about the delay in replying ...

My main inspirations for Mutual Decision are listed in the book. They come out of the better werewolf movies, mostly, in which the story is really about a romance that can't go on, or at least must be transformed.

Keep hunting for them - you won't be disappointed.

Best, Ron