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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 93 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: It's a hard job  (Read 1780 times)
angelfromanotherpin
Member

Posts: 132


« on: February 04, 2008, 02:34:05 PM »

i]at most.<player elimination: When a character bites it, his player stays in the game, as an abstraction giving bonuses to the remaining characters.  This role should have enough depth that the player stays engaged, but less power than while alive, so that death still has some bite.  Yes, the last character standing is hard to take down.  Also, maybe the mannerplayer elimination: When a character bites it, his player stays in the game, as an abstraction giving bonuses to the remaining characters.  This role should have enough depth that the player stays engaged, but less power than while alive, so that death still has some bite.  Yes, the last character standing is hard to take down.  Also, maybe the manner
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-My real name is Jules

"Now that we know how many angels can dance on the head of a pin, how do we determine how many angels are dancing, at a given time, on the head of a given pin?"
"What if angels from another pin engaged them in melee combat?"
Mikael
Member

Posts: 206


« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2008, 09:22:26 AM »

Don't know why this thread has not been getting more love; personally I think that the basic idea is inspired, if not necessarily easy to implement well.

Mostly the questions you have seem a matter of taste, and as such are yours to decide and design around. In my opinion, the mechanics should facilitate hard and furious action interlaced with some interludes where the characters are forced to think about the battle ahead, forced to acknowledge the high probability of no-one getting out alive ("I have a bad feeling about this"), and required to describe how the particular character reacts to this imminent doom. This "day before the great battle" is an often-used device in fiction, and essential, I think, to bringing out the characters' personalities and to make their fate matter. Especially if you plan on having a really fast character generation.
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contracycle
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Posts: 2807


« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2008, 09:38:40 AM »

As a thought, maybe this can be approached by differentiating between central and dependent characters, using the hardass idea.

You could build a group as a sort of sheriff plus posse, or lord plus retainers, whatever.  This major, hardass character is significantly more powerful than the others, but consequently would be called upon to lead from the front take more risks.  If/when they die, the hardass role can then pass to another player, so everyone gets a turn to be the empowered character.  This also allows losses among the lesser characters to be replaced immediately from a cadre of followers.

That might be useful in that it would shift the emphasis from 'making my guy survive', to going out in a glorious and useful fashion, and earning the rights to play the hardass next time.
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angelfromanotherpin
Member

Posts: 132


« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2008, 10:47:24 AM »

I'm thinking about two roles: Grunt and Specialist.  I think characters take levels in these, and missions are rated by how many levels you get to try them.  So a 5-level mission with 4 players has 3 players each take a character with 1 level, and 1 player takes either one character with 2 levels or two characters with 1 level. 

Grunts do the basic fighty-stuff.  They take hits better than Specialists and can have grunt-specialties like 'takes hits,' 'hits hard,' and 'runs fast.'

Specialists do mission-specific stuff, and have specific combat roles.  So an Engineer can blow a bridge and set booby traps, a Sniper can put down a dignitary in the middle of his elite guard and take out heavily armored enemies, and a Hacker can bypass security and shut down robots. 

For each level a character has, they get a secondary Skill, like Charm or First Aid, or what have you.

Actually, I think that's character creation: Each character has x levels in y roles.  Each level gives them a role skill, and a secondary skill.

Cinematically speaking, people tend to have 4 levels of injury: uninjured, injured, crippled, and dead.  Uninjured and dead are self-explanatory.  Injured people are impaired but still basically functional.  Crippled people groan a lot and have to be dragged around by their friends.  For simplicity's sake, I'm thinking of eliminating injured as a mechanical thing, so characters are bloodied or limping, but not actually penalized, but that's probably a playtest thing.

Hm, might be starting to move out of First Thoughts territory.
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-My real name is Jules

"Now that we know how many angels can dance on the head of a pin, how do we determine how many angels are dancing, at a given time, on the head of a given pin?"
"What if angels from another pin engaged them in melee combat?"
angelfromanotherpin
Member

Posts: 132


« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2008, 02:27:08 PM »

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-My real name is Jules

"Now that we know how many angels can dance on the head of a pin, how do we determine how many angels are dancing, at a given time, on the head of a given pin?"
"What if angels from another pin engaged them in melee combat?"
J. Scott Timmerman
Member

Posts: 164


« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2008, 02:30:23 PM »

Conflict of Interest in Element Introduction?  In it, I talk about all the little things that go on in a situation that are usually handled by system or the GM - such as paying attention to side consequences of actions or the off chance of something random happening.  These things I put under control of players who don't have characters involved in the current scene (even if the characters are physically there).  Something like that may give your players the ability to influence goings-on outside of a limiting character (like a dead character).

-JT
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Istvan
Guest
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2008, 11:23:40 PM »

What if you made the after death aspect a separate game line. The events in this game would have impact on the main game. I willtry to explain via some cheesy examples.

For example in the Quest to Destroy the Evil Artifact story the characters will have to go through several phases.

1) Find the artifact and take it
2) Find the way to destroy the artifact
3) Meet the requirements of 2 however many there are
4) Destroy artifact.

All the while they have to protect the artifact from the forces of evil who are trying to reclaim it.

What if at the same time, on another plain there was a linked storyline. Starting at some point in the previous line. The Evil Force exists in both planes, but the challenges and outcomes are different. The only way to defeat the evil force is in the orginal plane, but the EF perhaps can be weakened, and influenced in the second plane.

Let say at point 2, the Evil Force (EF) wants to reclaim the artifiact. To do so the EF unleashes dragons. Perhaps the number and strength of dragons released for the party to fight can be influenced by actions the already dead members have made in the Second plane.

Or should the characters be successful at a certain aspect of the second plane game they can particiapte in some of the material plane game as ghosts.

For example should the already dead character(s) sucessfully convince,trick,bribe,blackmail,perform a task for the lords of the underworld they can gain the ability to materialize once/twice/whatever times per day in a ghostly form. This can increase in power. perhasp they can at first just gesture, but as they gain experience they can speak, fight use magic etc..This would allow limited interaction and participation at the final climactic finish. For multiple story campaigns perhaps there could be a small chance for the dead to come back as undead with various restrictions, bonus and detriments.

This would require two DM's and great story writing to make effective, but perhaps it is feasible.


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Creatures of Destiny
Member

Posts: 66


« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2008, 03:24:31 PM »

I'm really curious about this project, also because my own project, Creatures of Destiny, is based around multiple characters and a bit of player distance from the characters.

This could be part of an ongoing campaign in which case I think you should definately have some measure of player success/reward that is seperate from character success/reward - since characters will be dying often. In this way players who are daring, dramatic, show pathos and generally play their characters well will "earn" stuff that they can pump into the next missions characters - so upping the ante. Sure they could come back as ghosts, but players could also bring in an originial character's brother/buddy/girlfirend or whatever who steps in to take their place. Basically a buddy system so that all a player's characters where connected in some way to each other.
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jamsthehobbit
Member

Posts: 4


« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2008, 05:37:36 PM »

I've actually been toying around with a similar idea myself (though I was going for a more Apocolyptic bent rather than just a "hard job").

One thing that immediately comes to my mind is maybe some neat goal mechanics. For example, you could give a character points or bonuses by progressing toward the "end goal." You could even throw in some interesting conflict by giving the characters side goals which provide an even bigger immediate bonus, but work against him/her in the long run. Maybe you could even work that in with the crippled/injury problem you were talking about.

For example, a character that progresses more toward the end goal could go out in a "big bang" if they end up on the chopping block. They could actually make their character die in a dramatic fashion with some big in-game bonuses toward their last actions. A character that chooses side goals, however, wouldn't be able to bump up his/her injury in such a way.

Just some thoughts. I love the concept. Really interested to see how it turns out.
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angelfromanotherpin
Member

Posts: 132


« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2008, 09:34:33 AM »

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-My real name is Jules

"Now that we know how many angels can dance on the head of a pin, how do we determine how many angels are dancing, at a given time, on the head of a given pin?"
"What if angels from another pin engaged them in melee combat?"
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