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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4283 Members Latest Member: - otto Most online today: 70 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: Power 19 for Magia, an attempt at making an RPG in Peru.  (Read 300 times)
Warrior Monk
Member

Posts: 85


« on: May 21, 2009, 09:36:37 PM »

b]1.) What is your game about?<2.) What do the characters do?
Characters are young magicians who just begin to explore the world of magic, meeting and learning from veteran mages and ancient entities. They get to battle the demon kin, other mages, creatures and events product of wild magic. Eventually they get an idea of the history of the whole magic reality and get to decide their role in it.

3.) What do the players do?
Players contribute to create a story by playing the characters and taking decisions involving events presented by the GM. They also get to discover most of the rules of the game and laws of the setting by trial and error.

4.) How does your setting (or lack thereof) reinforce what your game is about?<5.) How does the Character Creation of your game reinforce what your game is about?<6.) What types of behaviors/styles of play does your game reward (and punish if necessary)?<7.) How are behaviors and styles of play rewarded or punished in your game?
The more the character progresses, the more the abilities the player gets to modify the story and accomplish goals. Challenge can never be reduced to zero, though , at least until the end of the game. The better you deal with entities in the setting, the more you get to know about the rules and historical background in it, and the more complex the magic the character gets to make.

8.) How are the responsibilities of narration and credibility divided in your game?<9.) What does your game do to command the players' attention, engagement, and participation? (i.e. What does the game do to make them care?)<10.) What are the resolution mechanics of your game like?<11.) How do the resolution mechanics reinforce what your game is about?<12.) Do characters in your game advance? If so, how?
Advance depends on the magic the characters learn along the story and the bargains they make to gain the knowledge. For example, before being able to cast fire elemental magic, caster has to make a compact with a fire elemental creature. The more powerful the elemental, the higher the multiplier to the 2d6 roll for that element, and the more complex to fulfill the conditions of the compact. So gaining powers and skills is not as easy as expending xp gained for slashing creatures.

13.) How does the character advancement (or lack thereof) reinforce what your game is about?
By earning every skill and power the hard way and one bit a at a time, players start to appreciate everything they get and learn to use it in creative ways. They also learn the value of having good relationships with every npc in the setting as valuable sources of information and eventually, power.

14.) What sort of product or effect do you want your game to produce in or for the players?<15.) What areas of your game receive extra attention and color? Why?<16.) Which part of your game are you most excited about or interested in? Why?<
The game takes them to explore not only a setting but discovering the rules that govern it and learn to handle the ability to shape the setting.

18.) What are your publishing goals for your game?
A few copies of a small booklet to be offered in local conventions, nothing fancy.

19.) Who is your target audience?2.) What do the characters do?
Characters are young magicians who just begin to explore the world of magic, meeting and learning from veteran mages and ancient entities. They get to battle the demon kin, other mages, creatures and events product of wild magic. Eventually they get an idea of the history of the whole magic reality and get to decide their role in it.

3.) What do the players do?
Players contribute to create a story by playing the characters and taking decisions involving events presented by the GM. They also get to discover most of the rules of the game and laws of the setting by trial and error.

4.) How does your setting (or lack thereof) reinforce what your game is about?<5.) How does the Character Creation of your game reinforce what your game is about?<6.) What types of behaviors/styles of play does your game reward (and punish if necessary)?<7.) How are behaviors and styles of play rewarded or punished in your game?
The more the character progresses, the more the abilities the player gets to modify the story and accomplish goals. Challenge can never be reduced to zero, though , at least until the end of the game. The better you deal with entities in the setting, the more you get to know about the rules and historical background in it, and the more complex the magic the character gets to make.

8.) How are the responsibilities of narration and credibility divided in your game?<9.) What does your game do to command the players' attention, engagement, and participation? (i.e. What does the game do to make them care?)<10.) What are the resolution mechanics of your game like?<11.) How do the resolution mechanics reinforce what your game is about?<12.) Do characters in your game advance? If so, how?
Advance depends on the magic the characters learn along the story and the bargains they make to gain the knowledge. For example, before being able to cast fire elemental magic, caster has to make a compact with a fire elemental creature. The more powerful the elemental, the higher the multiplier to the 2d6 roll for that element, and the more complex to fulfill the conditions of the compact. So gaining powers and skills is not as easy as expending xp gained for slashing creatures.

13.) How does the character advancement (or lack thereof) reinforce what your game is about?
By earning every skill and power the hard way and one bit a at a time, players start to appreciate everything they get and learn to use it in creative ways. They also learn the value of having good relationships with every npc in the setting as valuable sources of information and eventually, power.

14.) What sort of product or effect do you want your game to produce in or for the players?<15.) What areas of your game receive extra attention and color? Why?<16.) Which part of your game are you most excited about or interested in? Why?<
The game takes them to explore not only a setting but discovering the rules that govern it and learn to handle the ability to shape the setting.

18.) What are your publishing goals for your game?
A few copies of a small booklet to be offered in local conventions, nothing fancy.

19.) Who is your target audience?
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