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Author Topic: [The Drifter’s Escape] Drives, Dreams, and peyote  (Read 1112 times)
Ron Edwards
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« on: December 17, 2009, 08:00:19 PM »

b]here<1969 - rural America - BRET HARTE, OKLAHOMA," and I should stress that the location bumps the culture-signature back at least five years. I'm not sure how many people reading this really grasp the era in question, but it has a lot more to do with Jack Kerouac's The Dharma Bums and Ken Kesey's The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test<Vagabond<
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here1969 - rural America - BRET HARTE, OKLAHOMA," and I should stress that the location bumps the culture-signature back at least five years. I'm not sure how many people reading this really grasp the era in question, but it has a lot more to do with Jack Kerouac's The Dharma Bums and Ken Kesey's The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test<Vagabond<
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Ron Edwards
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« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2009, 08:01:16 PM »

(continued post)

What do the cards do?

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Ron Edwards
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2010, 08:05:40 PM »

A quick revision, given that I'm now holding the published game in my hands. I had my ending-rules messed up a bit.

In Vagabond, Mona lost all her Drives.
In Requiem for a Dream, the protagonists all end up under the sway of the Devil.

I'm trying to think of examples in which the main character ends up under the thumb of the Man.

Best, Ron
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Ben Lehman
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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2010, 07:11:43 PM »

Dream or Debt] than both the other sides) not as "winning" but as "control over the Drifter's future." Basically, that player gets to determine what happens to the Drifter for the rest of their life, writing an epilogue to play.

The winning condition is slightly more nebulous "control over the Drifter's soul." The Drifter wins if she controls her own soul, the Devil or the Man win if they have gained control over it. The players are asked "is this the same as controlling the future? Or not?" and that's really up to them to decide. I like this winning condition because it engenders reflection on the meaning of the game. I know that at a recent con game the Man was mechanically behind but there was a general consensus among the players that we had won the game.

Maura won under this condition as well.

Maura's winning point was not redeeming Abe, but neutering the Man by selling you all on her character as a person. That's intentional. The Devil and the Man win in the same way (by selling the Drifter on their vision of her character as a person.)

yrs--
--Ben
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Ron Edwards
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« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2010, 12:03:22 PM »

Hi Ben!

1. Country music or not - agreed. But that conversation would get us into talking about too many things, so we can do that not-at-the-Forge. My only point here, because I think it'd be a good inspiration for Drifter's play, is to mention the scene in the movie Matewan, when all the various different groups involved in the miners' strike are playing their respective music simultaneously in the night, physically separated, and as they listen to one another, evolve bluegrass.

2. Your hippies comment makes me laugh. I saw the acknowledgments in you mention the "old hippies" game set in Oklahoma, and I thought, "Gee, who else did he play with, in an Oklahoma setting?" It took me a minute to realize you were talking about us. More specifically, as you know, the distinction between the sixties and the seventies is important to me, but we've talked about that already. Anyway, though, I think a 1970s game would have lots of potential of its own - the novel First Blood seems like a shoo-in, actually.

3. Full understanding and agreement regarding the Devil, the cards, and the generation of situation. I really like the difference having only one Devil character makes, but I'll keep it in mind that new ones might be generated in play itself, to keep Redemption from simply cleaning the Devil out of play.

Your Drifter's tables, in combination with Grey Ranks, had a huge influence on my current design of Shahida. So full agreement there about the tables.

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Do we want to get into the resolution thing? The purpose of a deal is not to get say over "what happens" but to cause through action something to happen or not happen (which is pretty much explicit in the phrasing). As I see it, this is a pretty major difference, but to each their own.
I see it as a major difference too, but I think I agree with you so much that there's nothing to discuss.

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As I recall, Stephen and Myra did not actually enter our play, directly, at all. ...

You're right, they didn't. The story was all about consequences, and those characters became back-story rather than players. I'm a big advocate of what you're implying, I think. It's sometimes hard to convince people that using a relationship map method based on, say, a published story, does not mean that the role-playing characters must enter that map at the same time and place that the protagonist of the book does.

Your general summary of our story jibes with my memories in full. The game serves wonderfully well as a Rorschach experience for the group concerning what they value in America. (I find myself using the inaccurate term "America" in this thread's posts because I'm referencing what citizens of the U.S. mean by that exact term and no other.)

Best, Ron
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