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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 158 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: [Nevercast] - A hyper-simulationist role-playing game, overview  (Read 8307 times)
David Berg
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Posts: 612


« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2010, 10:54:28 AM »

This seems very thorough, so I'll throw in the few things I didn't see covered:

Lighting:
In addition to shadow-casting, there are issues of general visibility, backlighting, and luminescence.  If it's very dark out, I may be able to see you moving slowly at a great distance atop a bare hill, but not be able to see you 70 feet away from me at the hill's base (with hill instead of sky behind you).  Also, if you are brighter than your environment, I can see you based on the difference -- a torch at midnight stands out more than a candle at dusk.

Terrain:
In addition to ambient noise and type of movement, there's also type of terrain.  So, the noise you create is a product of both your speed and whether you're moving over twigs, pine needles, concrete, mud, etc.

Regarding surprise, how do you intend to handle the following situation?

I am walking along the road.  I am partly on the lookout for trouble, but partly distracted by reading a map.  You are hiding in the bushes, hoping to jump out and put your knife to my throat (after which you may kill me instantly if you wish).  The bushes are two long strides from my path along the road.

How hard is it for you to achieve your goal?  Imagine you are the PC and I'm an NPC.  Then, imagine you are the NPC and I'm the PC.
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here's my blog, discussing Delve, my game in development
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #31 on: February 22, 2010, 12:03:58 PM »

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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #32 on: February 24, 2010, 12:27:30 PM »

What are Internal Arts?
Internal Arts are part of the Philosophy skill discipline.  They are concerned predominantly with meditational and breathing practices.

How is this useful?
Aside from developing your Insight, Awareness, and Focus attributes, the Internal Arts can be an effective practice for maintaining a clear mind during tough in-game situations.  Any situation that affects your Composure or Concentration effort pool may be positively enhanced via Internal Arts.  Thus, an excellent student can use their Concentration more often and more intensely, and are less likely to be perturbed under psychological stress - obvious benefits for any combat character.  At higher levels, many benefits become ingrained; you may be psychologically unaffected by extreme intimidation or physical pain.

How does it work?
Aside from the passive abilities you develop, there are few techniques.  As of right now, there are only 2: meditation and breathing exercise.  Meditation takes time, but it may give you bonuses for a few hours after practice.  Breathing exercise can be used during combat time, and it helps you to recover your Stamina and Concentration effort pools more quickly.
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2010, 09:01:12 PM »

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David Berg
Member

Posts: 612


« Reply #34 on: March 04, 2010, 07:10:46 PM »

Cool.  All sounds like stuff I'd like to potentially see in play.

I have a question: where do you intend to draw the line between reference vs ad-lib?  Like, if my character tries to put a minotaur in a choke hold, are you going to direct me to some charts and tables to calculate how that works, or are you going to say, "Talk it out with the GM and figure out what makes sense"?  Now what if I try to choke a were-fish?  When does the answer ("look it up" vs "figure it out") change?

Sorry for the crappy examples.  Also, I don't claim that you must think about this.  It's just something I'd be trying to define if I were in your shoes.
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here's my blog, discussing Delve, my game in development
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #35 on: March 04, 2010, 09:39:49 PM »

I'm trying my best to have a systemic answer - or at least an algorithm for GM determination - for any situation, while at the same time maintain a streamlined quality without special rules (i.e. consistency).  The core rules that exist now are the result of this design philosophy.  This helps the GM because he may not have the creativity or perspective to freeform his own rules effectively.  For the purposes of this game, I believe that because a great deal of responsibility is placed upon GM, the machinery ought to be autonomous and efficient so that he may focus on the story-telling aspects.

I should probably make a point that if rules for a specific situation aren't clear, then the GM has free reign to determine for himself as long as they don't contradict the core mechanics.  Every peripheral rule set in my system is based upon the logic of the core mechanics, so I'm certain the GM can figure something out without appearing arbitrary.
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David Berg
Member

Posts: 612


« Reply #36 on: March 04, 2010, 10:17:21 PM »

Gotcha.  Sounds similar to the goals of GURPS and some other "universal" systems, though yours may inject a bit more color (based on the examples in your first post).
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here's my blog, discussing Delve, my game in development
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #37 on: March 04, 2010, 11:14:44 PM »

When I design rules, GURPS is my cautionary tale.  It seems bloated and intimidating.  Just yesterday I was fiddling around with uber-realistic effects mechanics, where a body diagram tells you how you broke bones, cut muscle and tendons, blew off limbs, and damaged organs, and estimated about 200 or so ways to harm your opponent, all without the need to roll any dice!  The graphic potential makes me drool, but organizing the rules into a refined, easy-to-digest format is going to be a nightmare.
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David Berg
Member

Posts: 612


« Reply #38 on: March 05, 2010, 08:58:38 AM »

Yeah, search time (how long it takes during play to figure out how to proceed) is my main fear with such thorough systems.  Memorable visuals would go a long way (for me, anyway).  I think the body diagram idea is great!
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here's my blog, discussing Delve, my game in development
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #39 on: March 09, 2010, 08:06:18 AM »

On Critical Hits
So, I figured out a nice and simple method for scoring precision attacks on general body areas.  Your general body areas all have the same chance to hit in close quarters combat, but are somewhat different in ranged combat.  I'll get to that later, however.

Let's say you wanted to take your opponent out of the fight with a sharp kick to his kneecap.  You score your hit to the leg normally, but if you roll well on a 1d4 (25-50-75% depending on skill), you will compare the gradient of success to the vital area instead.  So, whereas a 3 effect might cause the "damaged" effect to the leg area, it will outright cripple the kneecap and cause immense, lasting pain.  Striking vital areas will most likely require concentration use in order to balance out the mechanics because precision attacks are quite difficult to pull off in the chaos of combat, and so that players don't get cheap and just start going to town on everyone's balls as an ultimate offensive strategy.
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horomancer
Member

Posts: 54


« Reply #40 on: March 10, 2010, 09:40:17 AM »

To be fair, going to town on everyone's eyeballs is a pretty good offensive strategy.
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2010, 05:36:04 AM »

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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #42 on: March 23, 2010, 08:22:15 AM »

Another change I'm considering:

Firearms may utilize 2 task resolution methods.
Rationale: In consideration for the unique dynamics of the action/reaction system, there are two distinct tasks which need to be resolved: the speed in which you aim the firearm and the accuracy in which you fire.  In the current design, your opponent may always respond to a firearm attack as long as he's aware of his opponent.
Change: The initial task resolution would be speed vs. the target's reflex (penalty imposed).  If reflex passes, then the target may use a response action, otherwise the shooter compares focus vs. passive defense.

Thoughts?
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #43 on: March 27, 2010, 03:33:49 AM »

That was a deeply profound insight.  I shall return to my lotus and meditate upon this.
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Ron Edwards
Global Moderator
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« Reply #44 on: March 28, 2010, 05:28:36 PM »

Don't respond to idiotic posts, please. It makes my job harder.

For those who missed it, Ar Kayon was responding to a troll. You can see his/its post in the Inactive File if you want, when it becomes visible again like it's supposed to be.

Please return to the regularly-scheduled thread topic.

Best, Ron
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