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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 158 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: [Nevercast] - A hyper-simulationist role-playing game, overview  (Read 7976 times)
David Berg
Member

Posts: 612


« Reply #45 on: March 28, 2010, 09:08:43 PM »

That firearms resolution sounds functional to me.  I'm a little fuzzy on Speed there, though.  Presumably, it represents how quickly you can aim accurately.  It might be fun, though, to be able to trade off speed and accuracy.  Like, opt to shoot faster (penalty to their Reflex roll?) to circumvent your opponent's response actions, but suffer a hit in accuracy for doing so.

I'm also not so sure how granular "accurate aiming" time is.  My guess would be that anyone with X amount of training in the weapon would do about the same.  Training would be big.  Speed?  I dunno.  You'd have to ask someone with shooting experience.
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here's my blog, discussing Delve, my game in development
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #46 on: March 29, 2010, 12:21:11 AM »

That firearms resolution sounds functional to me.  I'm a little fuzzy on Speed there, though.  Presumably, it represents how quickly you can aim accurately.  It might be fun, though, to be able to trade off speed and accuracy.  Like, opt to shoot faster (penalty to their Reflex roll?) to circumvent your opponent's response actions, but suffer a hit in accuracy for doing so.

I'm also not so sure how granular "accurate aiming" time is.  My guess would be that anyone with X amount of training in the weapon would do about the same.  Training would be big.  Speed?  I dunno.  You'd have to ask someone with shooting experience.

Speed only recognizes that you aimed onto an aware opponent before he has a chance to react and has nothing to do with accuracy.  Focus represents your accuracy when actually firing, and if your opponent gets the opportunity to move away from your aim, then he gets a huge bonus to his chances of not being hit at all. 

By separating aiming and firing, I can create a realistic sequence of events.  In particular, this mechanic allows me to clearly differentiate between large and small barreled guns in close-quarters firefights: because shorter barreled guns have a higher "maneuverability" score, you can aim faster with them, giving you the advantage when you need to quickly turn a corner and fire. 

Also, you may opt to draw and aim faster at a penalty to your focus check.
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #47 on: March 29, 2010, 12:38:26 AM »

Furthermore, if you're entrenched and don't know the exact positition of your opponents, I can easily model this by penalizing your aim when you come out of cover to fire.

Another interesting mechanic is that you don't even have to actually aim onto an opponent; you can aim onto a small area, like the area right above your opponent's cover, and when an opponent crosses that area, you get a speed, reflex and accuracy bonus against him.
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