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275647 Posts in 27717 Topics by 4285 Members Latest Member: - Jason DAngelo Most online today: 158 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: Combat Examples of an Engine without Hit Points  (Read 4731 times)
Finarvyn
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Posts: 83


WWW
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2010, 06:19:28 PM »

I'd also like to take a look at your entire system. It sounds quite interesting.

By the way, if you're looking for a different approach to a combat system without hit points, the Amber Diceless RPG does this by comparing Warfare ratings for combat, then Endurance ratings for staying-power, and allowing the story-telling to help dictate when one character is defeated. Your system reminds me a little of that one, only yours seems to have more attributes/skills to work through.
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Marv (Finarvyn)
Sorcerer * DFRPG * ADRP
I'm mosty responsible for S&W WhiteBox
OD&D Player since 1975
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2010, 09:24:47 PM »

That system was the inspiration for Nevercast's core mechanics.  However, I thought I could get the most bang out of my system if I eclectically combined fortune and diceless principles.  I refer to it as semi-diceless, and I am extremely satisifed with the results: diceless gives me reliability and is strategy-friendly; fortune gives me complexity.
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Lance D. Allen
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Posts: 1962


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« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2010, 10:27:29 PM »

I was floored to hear you toss off descriptions of what is called, in some circles, A "mortschlag" (sp?) and half-swording. Are you familiar with the ARMA?

A game worth checking out to see how someone else very successfully did the same thing is The Riddle of Steel, written by an active member of the ARMA. Unfortunately, it is out of official print, but you should be able to find information on it, at least. If you're interested, and can't find it, PM me and I'll dig for you.

Looking at your description of combat, it seems very opaque, with various maneuvers named and tactical decisions that may not be readily identifiable.. But I think that familiarity with the system would clear up a lot of that. I think the mechanical description does a good job of also being a narrative description, which is definitely a good thing in my book, though.
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~Lance Allen
Wolves Den Publishing
Eternally Incipient Publisher of Mage Blade, ReCoil and Rats in the Walls
Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2010, 11:55:41 PM »

Thank you for the positiive feedback.

I only have a passing familiarity with Riddle of Steel.  The reason why I made a medieval combat example was to demonstrate the system's fluidity; Nevercast is a science-fiction RPG.  Only Masters of the Martial Arts use modernized blades based off of the Chinese Jian.  (Black tungsten carbide for armor penetration and concealment and perhaps a carbon nanotube cross section to prevent breakage and to attract and store energy from the fuzz's pesky medium range electric weapons?  Just a thought; I have no idea if that could actually work.  Probably not.)
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2010, 07:17:12 AM »

Combat Example

Two masters agree to a duel, using their weapons of choice: Kanu Gon chooses the traditional Outworlder master's weapon, a Sword of Beauty, and the Des Xiac Pratnavahatdu, a progressivist master, chooses a .45 handgun with a 7 round magazine (not expecting the duel to last long).

Pratnavahatdu fakes a shot at Kanu Gon, who only slightly hesitates (Kanu Gon reflex passed). Pratnavahatdu then fires three times at Kanu Gon, who dives and somersaults obliquely towards him (dash pass). Pratnavahatdu fires again twice using an extra combat action to aim as Kanu Gon recovers, but Kanu Gon's instant reflex ability (uses up all concentration) improves his passive defense significantly as he almost precognitively shifts his body to avoid the shots.

Next round

Pratnavahatdu gets nervous as Kanu Gon gets close and quickly fires two rounds using concentration to improve the attack. Kanu Gon reacts with a response quick attack (long range strike ability allows him to lunge for extra reach with his blade), using an extra combat action to focus his blow. Both fighters compare the speed of their attack, and Kanu Gon strikes first as he gets lucky with his randomizer roll. Pratnavahatdu's instant reflex ability almost gets him out of the way but the cut of Kanu Gon's sword manages to split his cheek open (gradient of success +2). (they both now have 1 action remaining as Pratnavahatdu loses an action to recover from the blow)
On Kanu Gon's turn, he follows up with a killing stroke to the neck as Pratnavahatdu desperately tries to shoot him first in a response attack. The speed contest is even as they both pause and hold their weapons to each other. Realizing the stalemate, Kanu Gon and Pratnavahatdu back off of each other and bow, ending the duel.
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FetusCommander
Member

Posts: 21

also Rudy


« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2010, 11:26:01 AM »

This is a really interesting system, I'd definitely be interested in having the GM challenge me with this.  To me, the narration seems double good, since it allows people more stake in the encounters, and also makes the fighting cinematic.  That really seems like it would help with the "other dude's turn glaze" that happens in a lot of RPGs.  Additionally, it seems like the way someone describes their actions has strategic meaning for everyone at the table: so listening out to pick up what maneuvers someone is using is very beneficial.   

Your examples all make sense to me.

In your game, is there such a thing as "followers" (similar to the Leadership feat in D&D, where you have "pets" who follow you around)?  If so, do they use your turn for actions/use some of your action points? 

Like, how would something like a fight between a necromancer and his 2 skeletons vs. a single knight play out?
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2010, 08:58:37 PM »

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mauriciocabaleiro
Member

Posts: 16


« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2010, 07:40:01 AM »

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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2010, 07:45:20 AM »

Start a new thread about it.  I will be more than happy to talk about it there.
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #24 on: March 12, 2010, 06:04:21 AM »

An example of hand-to-hand combat.

Kanu Gon
6 strength
9 speed
6 endurance
7 agility
7 dexterity
8 reflex
4 awareness
6 focus
7 logic
5 charisma
6 insight

7 power
2 concentration
6 stamina

Meh Kada
10 strength
6 speed
8 endurance
5 agility
6 dexterity
6 reflex
6 awareness
8 focus
8 logic
4 charisma
8 insight

8 power
3 concentration
8 stamina


Round 1

1. Kanu Gon poises himself and waits for Meh Kada.

2. Meh Kada moves a 1 combat step forward, and then another (Kanu Gon responds by backing up 1).  Meh Kada feints, but Kanu Gon reacts minutely (feint failed).


Round 2<Tactical Breakdown
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Ar Kayon
Member

Posts: 190


« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2010, 11:33:33 AM »

Example 2

Indra
5 strength
6 speed
5 endurance
7 agility
8 dexterity
7 reflex
8 awareness
5 focus
6 logic
7 charisma
8 insight

5 power
3 concentration
5 stamina

Ar Jin Jee Ee
4 strength
6 speed
4 endurance
8 agility
8 dexterity
5 reflex
9 awareness
7 focus
5 logic
6 charisma
8 insight

5 power
4 concentration
4 stamina


Round 1<Round 2<Tactical Breakdown
*Because their dexterity is much higher than their other fighting attributes, Indra and Ar Jin naturally use techniques based on dexterity to secure their victory.  Unfortunately, their dexterity attributes are even, and the two fighters end up in a stalemate, even though Ar Jin has some slight advantages.  As a result, the key to winning for them relies on carefully conserving combat actions and concentration.  Thus, the combat pace will start slowing down as they take time to compose their thoughts and jockey for position, and then the pace will pick up again with numerous exchanges of blows.

*I chose two dexterity fighters for this exchange to demonstrate what a kung fu fight would look like using this system.  I also wanted to demonstrate contrast with the last combat example, which was meant to display something like Jeet Kune Do vs. Kickboxing or Muay Thai.
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